Everything listed under: truckee shrub

  • Fall Sale 2018 some details:

    Happy Fall 2018! (and Fall Sale details)
    Fall began Saturday, September 22 with the autumnal equinox.
    Starting Sunday September 23, Villager Nursery will offer 30% off all 6-pack, 4" and quart size herbaceous perennials and wildflowers... plant these now for a beautiful perennial garden next spring. The #1 gallon size and larger herbaceous perennials are 20% OFF until 10/14. 
    ALL of our huge selection of Trees & Shrubs are 20% OFF 
    Plus special selections at 30% off: 
      • Native Tundra Honeyberry: Lonicera caerulea, Honeyberry, Blue-berried Honeysuckle, Hacksap, a circumboreal species native to mountains and forests throughout the northern hemisphere, hardy to USDA zone 1 (≤ -50°F). Two varieties are required for pollination.
      • Native Single-leaf Piñon Pine: Pinus monophylla is the world’s only single-leaved pine. It is also a source of large piñon nuts and is of major cultural importance to Sierra and Great Basin indigenous people. It is said, “the Piñon is to the Great Basin people what the American Bison is to the Plain’s people”. We have some rare, beautiful #10g trees.
      • #10g 'Spring Snow' Sterile Crabapples: Spring Snow Crabapple has a solid mass of enormous white flowers without fruit on a perfect "lollipop tree' to 20’ tall and only 15’ wide.
      • Fruiting Apple, Cherry, Pear and Plum Trees: We offer many hardy varieties of fruiting apples primarily late-flowering and early fruiting. While it is best to have two varieties for pollination, nearby crabapples usually offer up enough pollen for fruit. Roman’s were responsible for propagating Montmorency Cherries in Europe. These “Tart” cherries produce fruit almost every year in spite of spring frosts.
      • Native Sierra Spiraea splendens var. splendens (of "broad ecological amplitude"). Cultivated varieties like 'Summer Song' are 20% off.
      • Hardy Vines:  Clematis including western native C. columbiana. Hardy Kiwi (vigorous vine, yet to see fruit), Hop vine, Honeysuckle, Porcelain Vine, Virginia Creeper, and a few even more interesting options.

      • Elderberry, Currant, Gooseberry, Grape, Blueberry and Honeyberry Shrubs. 

    AND 40% Off one of our best native screening shrubs:

     • Native Green Chokecherries: Our native Prunus virginiana var. demissa. The cultivated variety of P. virginiana var. melanocarpa ‘Canada Red’ (@ 20% off) has a purplish leaf in summer. Chokecherries are fast-growing with abundant and fragrant spring flowers and fruit that makes excellent jelly.  It also has nice orange fall color and can be hedged to almost any height.

    There is also a coupon for Biosol, a coupon for hardy deer-proof Bulbs and Buy-4, Get 1 Free special on ALL Composts, Potting Soils, Manures  and Bark Mulches. 

    Bulbs are 10% off individual bulb prices or individual packets.  10% off G&B Fertilizers.  And there's a coupon for $_ off Biosol fertilizer (also bring a bucket for 12lb Biosol @ 19.99).

    -A link to the newsletter.

  • A Fall Sale

    Fall Sale... there is so much to do... 
    Other than 10 years ago and last week, FALL really is the best time for planting here and we really have been bringing in truckloads of fresh crops every week. We also understand that fall is crowded with "chores" and that our eventual snows do curb planting enthusiasm. 
    So... Here's to Fall Planting Season and a Fall Sale at THE perfect time.

    At the risk of sounding like a broken record (we do wind-up saying the same things over and over), there is no BAD time to plant here, though digging through snow (or worse, frozen soil) adds to the adventure of preparing a hole. We are ALWAYS planting for NEXT spring when plants will emerge at the right time in your garden in rich amended soil and a much larger root-system than they had in the pot when they were planted in fall. The plants will look the way they're supposed to look in our mountain gardens. When we plant in fall, the wait for spring is not so long. 
    Fall weather is also cooler and easier on us and the tops of plants (reduced moisture loss) while the soil is continuing to warm (encouraging vital and precious root growth) until mid-November. There is no better time to plant. Deciduous woody trees and shrubs produce ~80% of their new roots in fall, AFTER they lose their leaves, and another ~20% in late winter, before leaves emerge. Conifers produce most of their roots in late winter, under the melting snow. The bigger the root system the more vigorous, robust and drought tolerant the plant. A wide planting hole, ample compost, plenty of organic fertilizers and mulch on top of the soil, all promote roots and thus healthy, vigorous plants.

    We are still bringing in fresh plant material weekly with more trucks arriving from our growing-grounds these next two weeks. There have been quite a few people asking. The inventory and selection is AMAZING and now, the PLANTS ARE ON SALE!  Sign up for our newsletter for details (I'm still finishing the newsletter).
  • Sagehen Creek Wildflowers

    I have not had a report since Monday but with the warmer weather, this weekend should be "peak bloom" for the camas lilies down Sagehen creek.  In honor of that occurrence, I made up a little spreadsheet based on Calflora's "what grows here?" website. Click Here.  Calfora has terrific tools but they do frequently lag behind in updated last names and their "what grows here" lists are far from comprehensive... still, we love them.



  • October Winterizing and Fall Planting Blow-Out Specials

    Late October Nursery Sale thru 10/31

    Check-out the latest newsletter, for those on the e-mail list. http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?m=1102261798136&ca=c5638956-cc07-477b-a090-e8ee25d95775

    Details enclosed.  There are some really great deals. Really.  Check it out for coupons but some of the specials are here:

    October Sale Details   (all discounts are off regular individual prices)
    50% Off: Honeyberry, Twinberry, Mock Orange, Sumac and Oaks
    50% Off: Botanical Interests packets of vegetable and flower seeds
    40% Off: 4" and quart wildflowers & perennials.  Hardy vines including hop & clematis.
    30% Off: Woody trees* and shrubs including many spring flowering and fall coloring plants plus all sizes of perennials and groundcovers larger than quart pots. 
    30% Off: Outdoor pottery, birdbaths and redwood planters
    20% Off: *Quaking Aspen (full truck-load arriving this week).
    20% Off: All G&B Lawn (and others) and Dr.Earth fertilizers (apply with BIOSOL).
    10% Off: Hardy bulbs (excludes bulk bags and crates always @ 20% off)
    10% Off: Winterizing Tree Tape (Villager-Brown 1"x150'x8mil. plus others up to 20mil)

    Visit our Facebook page, our website References page and come by the nursery soon to shop the sale for the best choices.  If you found this newsletter on-line or via Facebook, sign-up to receive your very own.
  • Happy Fall 2016! (and Fall Sale details)

    Fall begins Thursday September 22 with the autumnal equinox. I'm in Ouray, CO w/family collecting native seed and appreciating the fall colors (as I have many times over the years).  We have no internet at the house and the cell service is spotty so a "hot-spot" doesn't really work.  I've run into town for the day and parked at Mouse's to use their wi-fi (thanks again) to write a newsletter / sale-flier. The Newsletter highlights our MANY truck-loads of plants over the past 3 weeks and a Fall Sale. My communication with the shop has been rare as well so please forgive them if they didn't know I was writing this.

    Starting Saturday, 9/24, Villager Nursery will offer 40% off all 6-pack, 4" and quart size herbaceous perennials and wildflowers... plant these now for a beautiful perennial garden next spring. The #1 gallon size and larger herbaceous perennials are a whopping 30% OFF until 10/16. ALL of our huge selection of Trees & Shrubs are 20% OFF plus Danny's special selection: 

    Danny's Sale Selection: a large handful of 30% OFF specials…

    Native Tundra Honeyberry: Lonicera caerulea, Honeyberry, Blue-berried Honeysuckle, Hacksap, a circumboreal species native to mountains and forests throughout the northern hemisphere, hardy to USDA zone 1 (≤ -50°F). Two similar varieties are required for pollination.

    Native Single-leaf Piñon Pine: Pinus monophylla is the world’s only single-leaved pine. It is also a source of large piñon nuts and is of major cultural importance to Sierra and Great Basin indigenous people. It is said, “the Piñon is to the Great Basin people what the American Bison is to the Plain’s people”. We have some rare, beautiful #5g trees.

    Native Green Multi (& Single-Trunk Canada Red) Chokecherries: Our native Prunus virginiana var. demissa  and the Rocky Mountain P. virginiana var. melanocarpa. The cultivated variety ‘Canada Red’ has a purplish leaf in summer. It is a fast growing species with fragrant and abundant spring flowers and bitter fruit that makes great jelly (I know!) As fast-growing a tree as Aspen.

    Marilee and Dolgo Crabapples: Marilee Flowering Crabapple has large pink buds and abundant, enormous double white flowers without fruit on a narrow tree 20’ tall and only 10’ wide.  Dolgo is a large (30’+) shade tree with fragrant white blooms and large edible crabapples (1 1/2” dia.) fruit.

    Fruiting Apple & Cherry Trees: We offer many hardy varieties of fruiting apples primarily late-flowering and early fruiting. While it is best to have two varieties for pollination, nearby crabapples usually offer up enough pollen for fruit. Roman’s were responsible for propagating Montmorency Cherries in Europe. These “Tart” cherries produce fruit almost every year in spite of spring frosts.

    Hedge and Bigtooth Maples: Acer campestre, hedge maple, has been used for dense screening for over 1000 years in Europe. It is hardy and relatively fast growing with Aspen-gold fall color.  Acer grandidentatum is native to the dry, cold eastern shores of the Great Basin. Bigtooth maple in the Wasatch range has incredible fall colors and is also grown to produce maple syrup. It is being planted en masse in Brickletown (see pic. in the newsletter)

    Hardy Vines:  I’m not in the nursery today but I know we have several of my favorite hardy Clematis including western native C. columbiana. Hardy Kiwi (vigorous vine, yet to see fruit), Hops (plant in the back-40), Hardy (USDA z.3) Honeysuckle and a few even more interesting options.

    There is also a coupon for Biosol, a coupon for hardy deer-proof Bulbs and Buy-3, Get 1 Free special on ALL Composts, Potting Soils, Manures  and Bark Mulches. 

  • September

    We LOVE September. We get our town, our lakes and our mountains back from the throngs of visitors. We relish this quieter time of year with warm days, cool nights and the chance of interesting weather (we are expecting light frost Thurs.-Sun.) We have promoted "Fall is for Planting" for decades and many still don't understand why... so we often do our best to pretend September is just late-summer (it really kind-of is). This year we EMBRACE Autumn! The harbingers of fall color (Amur maple) are turning, the Asters are blooming, bulbs have arrived in the shop and we are entering the BIG "sweet-spot" of the gardening season with 2 full months of planting ahead of us. Our "frost-free period" (noaa) is July 15-Aug 15. That puts 9/1 on par with 7/1 and October equates to May. As we all know, April and November can either be warm or wintery and usually both.  In fall the soils are still warm and are usually still gaining heat until early / mid-November.  Deciduous trees like maples, aspen and crabapples initiate ~80% of their annual root-system expansion in fall... after they lose their leaves. To do this they need warm soil and moisture (you may need to water). Early snow insulates the soil and promotes extra root growth. For plants in our climate to survive and thrive, they need massive root-systems.  Most of what we do concerning planting and care is in order to produce wider and deeper root-systems. Fall is THE best time to do this.  Fall IS for planting.

    The next few nights of light frost combined with dry conditions should spell EXCELLENT fall color in the landscapes this year.
    Sale: ALL #5g Lilacs: 34.99-39.99 @ 19.99

    All #1g Lilacs 6.99

    18lb Organic & Nitrogen 8-1-1 Fertilizer (Great early fall, late summer feeding for ALL plants) reg 29.99 for $19.99

    Out Fall Sale (9/3-9/14 was quite busy, sign-up for our occasional newsletters if you're interested in sales, specials and seasonal advice)

  • Hailstorm & Crazy

     

    12:50PM 9 July 2015, I was leaving town to go for an afternoon hike on the west side, taking Old 40 for beauty-sake and I stopped to take a picture of town getting (what I THOUGHT was) rain. I posted to Villager Nursery Facebook how using row-cover can save your garden from hail damage.  Minutes later driving over the summit, Rob sent me this picture.

      

    We were not hit as hard as part of Glenshire / Cambridge was hit in 2013 (TOTAL defoliation) but we suffered 20-30% foliage loss. Pretty rough. The perennials, trees and shrubs will be fine with some torn leaves. Everyone here covered (with row-cover) what they could of the annual color, on VERY short notice and they're perfect.  We've already been giving them seaweed for cell strength and protection as well as organic fertilizers to help them flush-out again this summer. We are working on a Hailstorm Sale Newsletter  this weekend for plants that just won't look as fantastic as they did (this summer) before the 9th.

     

    Marbles falling from ±35,000 ft. Ouch.

     

     

  • Water Restrictions and Exemptions in the TDPUD sphere...

     

    Because our irrigation restrictions WERE greater than those in Placerville, Auburn, the Tahoe Basin and MANY other districts...  AND because (as we are frequently told by TDPUD) we have recharging water tables and adequate (if not ample) water supply, WE requested (and were granted: 6/3/15) a hardship exemption, on behalf of the community. SO...  IN-SPITE of our PUD's best efforts to tell you through various media that you can ONLY irrigate on Tuesday and Friday, you can in-fact irrigate as needed when watering responsibly with drip (incl. micro-spray, soakers & drip emitters), syringing (a light spray to cool-off stressed plants), and selectively hand-watering specific plants, planters, and spots in need. "*Plant containers, trees, shrubs, ground covers and vegetable gardens may be watered as needed when using automatic drip irrigation or hand-watering".  The Truckee Demonstration Garden's efforts very early-on gave us the exemption to irrigate all edibles as needed (taken as annual & perennial vegetables, herbs, berry bushes and fruit trees).

    PLEASE.... NO BARE SOIL in your garden. MULCH everywhere. Mulch on bare soil 10 feet from your plants is keeping that fine-silty soil from drying-out and from wicking water away from your plants. DO NOT mulch over tree or shrub trunks or over herbaceous plants (unless with a fine compost like Topper).

    AND..  WATER YOUR SURROUNDING FOREST.  2-4 times this summer, on your watering day, put an oscillating sprinkler out among the big pines and fir surrounding your home, near and as far as you can go.  Water enough to soak the soil 2-3 feet.  We may have "adequate" supply in our wells but we are definitely in a drought and our soils are DRY!. Trees are dying all around us from the past 3 dry winters (desiccation & beetle attack) and you can prevent yours from dying by giving them a couple of deep waterings.

     

  • 2015 TDPUD Emergency Drought Regulations Hardship Exemption Request APPROVED

    Our request for an exemption to the 2015 TDPUD Emergency Drought Regulations (on behalf of the community) was approved this afternoon (6/3/15) for "Plant containers, trees, shrubs, groundcover, and vegetable gardens may be watered as needed when using automatic drip irrigation or hand watering." You can still have your planter boxes THIS summer. Be sure to use water-holding gel in your containers and MULCH your landscapes! NO BARE SOIL! We STILL have to reduce our overall water consumption by 28%. Tuesday & Friday for lawns, established landscapes and any spray heads and as needed for efficient drip irrigation. PUD

     

    We spent 5 stress filled days researching other districts, communicating with the PUD, discussing options, drafting proposals and ultimately submitting the request for exemption that they ultimately approved.


  • 2014 Garden Tour Preview

    Pre Tour CollageRob, Druann and I were allowed to attend the docent / hosts preview tour of the gardens. Our thought being that we could offer insight, ID plants or answer questions the garden club members might have but this is a pretty savvy group and there was not too much we could offer.  There were several plant ID questions that will likely come-up during the tour so I jotted down a few comments here.  You can also visit our Facebook page where it is much easier to post photos and make comments than it is on our web-page.Eric @ Garden Pre Tour

  • July Color Sale 7/11-7/13

    Post 4th of July Weekend SALE on Veggies, Annual Color and (as requested) Hardy Herbaceous Perennials, Groundcovers and Wildflowers. Sale ENDS Sunday 7/13.

    Tomatoes, Greens, and Beans plus other veggies are 40% OFF.  Annual (and tender perennial) COLOR for sun ad for shade all 40% OFF.

    Hardy Herbaceous Perennials and Mountain Native Wildflowers (that look best en masse) buy 3 of any variety and get 1 FREE.

    Tough Roses and Evergreen Mugo Pines are also buy 3 of any variety and get a 4th FREE.

    Water plants are 20% OFF or Buy 2 and get 1 FREE!

    AND Gromulch Compost, Topper, Amend and Black Forest Top-Mulch are buy 4 (of same size & price) and get a 5th bag FREE.

  • Solstice Summer Sale

    We've been trying to carve out a few minutes to make a Spring Promotion Newsletter, so here it is, a few days past Summer Solstice, a sale to last until nearly 4th of July.  Get your garden on if you have not yet... I planted my greens in early April but have not had a chance to start my Tomatoes yet - (It has become an tradition for me to stay home from the parade to plant mine up.)  They're all 20% off until the 3rd along with beans, cukes, peas, squash, peppers, lettuce, etc....  The mature composts from Kellogg as well as the garden enhancing Chicken and Farmyard composts are all buy-three-get-one-free now as well so side-dress away.  We put a couple of awesome #5g shrubs (maple and chokecherry) on special for your screening needs this week, because they are fantastic.  Ad 30% off of our Apples, hardy Cherries, and incredibly productive currants and gooseberries is a smokin' deal - you can use fruiting shrubs as ornamentals without worry, they're tough and attractive as well as productive.  Sales run through July 3.  Our 4th of July hours are roughly 9-10 and 12-2... depending on traffic and the parade when we are closed.  Please swing by and say hello if you're walking the route (or throw us extra candy if you're on a float).

  • Winter Watering January 2012

    People were pointing and actually laughing at us as they pulled off I-80 when we fired-up the irrigation system for the nursery and landscape this Friday (1/5).  Their loss I guess. We have been fielding calls every day, usually prefaced by "...this might be a stupid question but..." at which point I often interrupt and say "Yes, you should water" (...as though I could read minds).  In our Planting Instructions and Winterizing hand-outs, we say: "Maple, Birch and Alder are particularly susceptible to drought injury in late fall and winter. Always send your garden into winter with moist soil. The last watering is often around Thanksgiving. Even dormant trees need water, so... if we have no substantial rain or snow, water at least once a month, even through the winter."  Your plants are sleeping, they're not dead.
    In sunny locations if the snow is gone, trees and shrubs planted within the last 2 years, small plants, young plants and groundcovers would love to be watered.  We have been watering the sunny south-facing slopes in the nursery since we had that little rain last week.  I watered the sunniest parts of my exposed lawn earlier this week.  Think "light rain" when watering. You want to avoid saturating frozen soil and creating a solid ice layer that will suffocate roots and beneficial soil microbes but all those same components of soil need some moisture to survive. Water only during the warmest part of the day (when temps are well over 40°F) and give the water a chance to soak well in before afternoon shade and cooling sets in.
    This is a year when we are glad we promote antitranspirant applications and plenty of mulch.  

    Colorado State University has a handout on the subject and we are pretty much in agreement with what they say: look here.
    The temperatures turned dramatically cold this fall before many plants had a chance to naturally shut-down (many still have leaves on them). These would be more susceptible to winter die-back in a NORMAL winter. I am already seeing damage to some evergreens (Cedar and Giant Sequoia) and broadleaf evergreens (Holly, Oregon Grape and Manzanita). It will be yet another instructive winter seeing what really THRIVES in our always challenging climate... stay tuned.

Contact Villager

Villager Nursery, Inc
10678 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, CA 96161-4834
Central Truckee, exit 186 off I-80
(530) 587-0771
www.villagernursery.com
info@villagernursery

Founded 1975, Incorporated 1990

California Nursery License 1975
No. C 3976.001, Co.29CA
Contractors License 1977
No. 413907-C27 LS
ISA Certified Arborist: Eric Larusson
No. WE-7983A

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