Everything listed under: native plants

  • Sagehen Creek Wildflowers

    I have not had a report since Monday but with the warmer weather, this weekend should be "peak bloom" for the camas lilies down Sagehen creek.  In honor of that occurrence, I made up a little spreadsheet based on Calflora's "what grows here?" website. Click Here.  Calfora has terrific tools but they do frequently lag behind in updated last names and their "what grows here" lists are far from comprehensive... still, we love them.



  • "Shoulder Season"

    "Shoulder Season" in the travel industry came to mean the periods between high season and low season. In Truckee, since we have high season and high season, it should maybe be called "waist" season. The lake seems to experience this between seasons lul more than Truckee does these days. In the nursery, our busiest season is spring. We rapidly ramp-up from late April until early July when our business slowly tapers off into fall when, because FALL IS FOR PLANTING, we have a little bump in activity that quickly fades into the shoulder season: October and November when folks are otherwise occupied (gathering acorns or maybe wood). We reduce our hours and close on Sundays (we have to gather acorns too).  We still have planting projects and many landscapers are still active until the soils freeze or deep snow makes it impractical to dig. We plant a lot of bulbs and wildflower seed and the shoulder season is the best time for non-irrigated restoration / revegetation work.  The autumnal thermal overturn is just around the corner when soils begin to freeze and stay frozen (the perfect time to spread Biosol...everywhere). 

    "Ecology books speak of the "autumnal thermal overturn" when the average air temperature stays colder than the average soil temperature.  We hope for a good deep frost before the snows come because it is makes digging harder for voles.  'If ice skating is good the voles won't be as bad next spring'.  Deep in the soil the earth is consistently warm and once the blanket of insulating snow covers it, the soil begins to thaw allowing roots to continue expanding".  Wildflower seeding on top of the first 3" of snow is a technique that has worked very well for many."

    Winterizing the gardens and tying-up young plantings also occupies a bit of time in the shoulder season. Fall lawn care is essential. We stake and wrap the lower branches of trees and shrubs for the first 2-3 winters to protect their important "photosynthetic potential" (energy producing leaf surfaces) that feed the trunk to improve caliper and help develop good taper.

    Now is still a great time for planting all sorts of plants, we usually have some daily or weekly specials we post to FB or the chalkboard based on something we notice that we have a LOT of or that's just cool or interesting.  We ave begun to put the nursery away for the winter, tucking the pots into shade, giving them an anti-transpirant and tossing around plant-skydd animal repellent. Rob and crew will be out wrapping trees and shrubs once leaves fall and after that, we'll go cut a few Christmas trees.

  • October Winterizing and Fall Planting Blow-Out Specials

    Late October Nursery Sale thru 10/31

    Check-out the latest newsletter, for those on the e-mail list. http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?m=1102261798136&ca=c5638956-cc07-477b-a090-e8ee25d95775

    Details enclosed.  There are some really great deals. Really.  Check it out for coupons but some of the specials are here:

    October Sale Details   (all discounts are off regular individual prices)
    50% Off: Honeyberry, Twinberry, Mock Orange, Sumac and Oaks
    50% Off: Botanical Interests packets of vegetable and flower seeds
    40% Off: 4" and quart wildflowers & perennials.  Hardy vines including hop & clematis.
    30% Off: Woody trees* and shrubs including many spring flowering and fall coloring plants plus all sizes of perennials and groundcovers larger than quart pots. 
    30% Off: Outdoor pottery, birdbaths and redwood planters
    20% Off: *Quaking Aspen (full truck-load arriving this week).
    20% Off: All G&B Lawn (and others) and Dr.Earth fertilizers (apply with BIOSOL).
    10% Off: Hardy bulbs (excludes bulk bags and crates always @ 20% off)
    10% Off: Winterizing Tree Tape (Villager-Brown 1"x150'x8mil. plus others up to 20mil)

    Visit our Facebook page, our website References page and come by the nursery soon to shop the sale for the best choices.  If you found this newsletter on-line or via Facebook, sign-up to receive your very own.
  • Villager Winter Hours 2015-16

    Villager Nursery Winter Hours 2015-16
    We will be closed 12/24 -12/28 (We MAY be in for an couple of hours 12/24 but Call first)
    Open Again 12/29-12/3. And then we’ll be “Mostly Closed” until early March. (early-mid-March is when we start tomato & pepper seeds indoor for planting outdoors in May.
    We wish EVERYONE a Merry Christmas & a Very Happy New Year! Thank You All!


  • September

    We LOVE September. We get our town, our lakes and our mountains back from the throngs of visitors. We relish this quieter time of year with warm days, cool nights and the chance of interesting weather (we are expecting light frost Thurs.-Sun.) We have promoted "Fall is for Planting" for decades and many still don't understand why... so we often do our best to pretend September is just late-summer (it really kind-of is). This year we EMBRACE Autumn! The harbingers of fall color (Amur maple) are turning, the Asters are blooming, bulbs have arrived in the shop and we are entering the BIG "sweet-spot" of the gardening season with 2 full months of planting ahead of us. Our "frost-free period" (noaa) is July 15-Aug 15. That puts 9/1 on par with 7/1 and October equates to May. As we all know, April and November can either be warm or wintery and usually both.  In fall the soils are still warm and are usually still gaining heat until early / mid-November.  Deciduous trees like maples, aspen and crabapples initiate ~80% of their annual root-system expansion in fall... after they lose their leaves. To do this they need warm soil and moisture (you may need to water). Early snow insulates the soil and promotes extra root growth. For plants in our climate to survive and thrive, they need massive root-systems.  Most of what we do concerning planting and care is in order to produce wider and deeper root-systems. Fall is THE best time to do this.  Fall IS for planting.

    The next few nights of light frost combined with dry conditions should spell EXCELLENT fall color in the landscapes this year.
    Sale: ALL #5g Lilacs: 34.99-39.99 @ 19.99

    All #1g Lilacs 6.99

    18lb Organic & Nitrogen 8-1-1 Fertilizer (Great early fall, late summer feeding for ALL plants) reg 29.99 for $19.99

    Out Fall Sale (9/3-9/14 was quite busy, sign-up for our occasional newsletters if you're interested in sales, specials and seasonal advice)

  • July Color Sale 7/11-7/13

    Post 4th of July Weekend SALE on Veggies, Annual Color and (as requested) Hardy Herbaceous Perennials, Groundcovers and Wildflowers. Sale ENDS Sunday 7/13.

    Tomatoes, Greens, and Beans plus other veggies are 40% OFF.  Annual (and tender perennial) COLOR for sun ad for shade all 40% OFF.

    Hardy Herbaceous Perennials and Mountain Native Wildflowers (that look best en masse) buy 3 of any variety and get 1 FREE.

    Tough Roses and Evergreen Mugo Pines are also buy 3 of any variety and get a 4th FREE.

    Water plants are 20% OFF or Buy 2 and get 1 FREE!

    AND Gromulch Compost, Topper, Amend and Black Forest Top-Mulch are buy 4 (of same size & price) and get a 5th bag FREE.

  • Solstice Summer Sale

    We've been trying to carve out a few minutes to make a Spring Promotion Newsletter, so here it is, a few days past Summer Solstice, a sale to last until nearly 4th of July.  Get your garden on if you have not yet... I planted my greens in early April but have not had a chance to start my Tomatoes yet - (It has become an tradition for me to stay home from the parade to plant mine up.)  They're all 20% off until the 3rd along with beans, cukes, peas, squash, peppers, lettuce, etc....  The mature composts from Kellogg as well as the garden enhancing Chicken and Farmyard composts are all buy-three-get-one-free now as well so side-dress away.  We put a couple of awesome #5g shrubs (maple and chokecherry) on special for your screening needs this week, because they are fantastic.  Ad 30% off of our Apples, hardy Cherries, and incredibly productive currants and gooseberries is a smokin' deal - you can use fruiting shrubs as ornamentals without worry, they're tough and attractive as well as productive.  Sales run through July 3.  Our 4th of July hours are roughly 9-10 and 12-2... depending on traffic and the parade when we are closed.  Please swing by and say hello if you're walking the route (or throw us extra candy if you're on a float).

  • Colder NIghts - Frost Warning

    5/13: Frost potential the next few nights. Row-cover over tender plants. According to noaa, Truckee's "frost free period" is July 15-August 15 when we have a statistically lower than 15% chance of frost on each night.  Facebook Post

  • 3rd Dry Winter... so far

    We all hope this force-field around the Sierras will vanish soon and let in our moisture.  That little bit of drizzle and snow was beneficial for sure but not nearly enough for landscapes nor for our snow-dependent businesses.  I count on nordic skiing to get me in shape for working all summer and I've been once... in Utah.

    If you have new platings in a sunny location that has no snow you might consider dragging out a hose and giving those new plantings some water. This is a winter-watering blog from January 2012:  http://www.villagernursery.com/winter-watering-january-2012

  • Truckee Spring - Mid-May

    Day-length pretty close to its maximum now, the soils continue to absorb the sun's radiation and the average temperatures are climbing.  May starts with an average low of 27°F and ends with an average low of 34°F.  Our night-time temps have been WAY above average for weeks an averages are just the mathematical numbers in the middle of the extremes of reality.  It will be nearly miraculous (or ominous) if we don't have more snow and a lot more frost.  That is not to deter gardening, God-knows I've been going at it since early April and am delighted at my gardens.  My comments are to remind you to be prepared to cover when the cold returns.

    We are having a HUGE sale on our pre-packaged 10x12' 1.5oz frost fabric (packaged by "easy gardener") reg. 15.99 on sale for 10.99 through Memorial Day.  It is great to use when transitioning plants from the house or shade to the outdoors as well.  I just leave it over the plants for a few days.  It is also important to have on hand in for fall cold when I often leave it over the garden for days or weeks at a time.  AND as a bonus... WE use it top protect ferns, hosta, rhubarb, thimbleberry and dogwood from HAIL!  it works great.  If hail is called for, I cover plants before leaving for work.


  • Getting Out: Hiking, Botanizing.

    I wind up working quite a bit.  I love my work and usually don't mind really.  Two of my "fun" days this summer were climbing peaks and checking out the alpine vegetation...  (pictures to follow).  

    I grew-up in Pollock Pines in the 1970's  We moved there from the peninsula when I was in 5th grade - I thought I'd died and gone to heaven... snakes, frogs, trees to climb, creeks, rocky rivers, etc...  We had an ecosystem / arboretum behind Pinewood school and teachers who loved the woods (two were back-country forest rangers out of Wrights Lake).  

    Desolation Wilderness was my old "stompin' ground". Soooo... I begged to go when my daughters' nordic comp-team said they were hiking Pyramid Peak.  We piled in the vans for a fun ride over and hit the trail at Horsetail Falls.  The pace was quick but I wasn't dead last.  The falls were raging as we picked our way up the west side.  Penstemon and Spiraea were in bloom.  The highlights of the hike were the hanging gardens on some of the cliffs with clear water sheeting off clean salt and pepper granite and flowing around little islands of luch vegetation before disappearing over the next ledge.  And, the final pitch up a boulder field to an amazing view from the peak.

    Then those crazy people RAN down the south side.  I wanted to stop every few seconds to take pictures of the wildflowers, but the team would have been gone!  The Phlox and Polemonium were is full bloom.

    The other hike was late in the season up Mt. Rose for the first time.  I was in awe of the huge diversity of plants in the rocks near the top.  I suppose it is a true fellfield, an alpine tundra.  If you've never been, I suggest you make the effort.  It is not a hard hike but if you try to run near the top, you can feel the altitude.   The cascade waterfall halfway up is a nice spot to rest and there are lupine there over 6'tall.

Contact Villager

Villager Nursery, Inc
10678 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, CA 96161-4834
Central Truckee, exit 186 off I-80
(530) 587-0771
www.villagernursery.com
info@villagernursery

Founded 1975, Incorporated 1990

California Nursery License 1975
No. C 3976.001, Co.29CA
Contractors License 1977
No. 413907-C27 LS
ISA Certified Arborist: Eric Larusson
No. WE-7983A

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