Everything listed under: tahoe native plants

  • Sagehen Creek Wildflowers

    I have not had a report since Monday but with the warmer weather, this weekend should be "peak bloom" for the camas lilies down Sagehen creek.  In honor of that occurrence, I made up a little spreadsheet based on Calflora's "what grows here?" website. Click Here.  Calfora has terrific tools but they do frequently lag behind in updated last names and their "what grows here" lists are far from comprehensive... still, we love them.



  • Willow & Aspen Fungal Foliage Funks

    Aspen Fungal Foliage Diseases - "Many fungi are capable of attacking aspen leaves, from juvenile growth to senescence. However, only a few may be of local significance; and even then, their damage is of consequence only when they cause moderate to severe defoliation. Small trees suffer the most damage, and may be killed by repeated infections. Clonal susceptibility to individual foliage diseases is common, but under certain conditions, whole stands can become infected. Because these fungi kill areas of leaves and often cause premature defoliation, their damage is usually confined to reduced tree growth of severely infected trees. Therefore, in most areas, these diseases are not important in aspen management" (Christensen et al. 1951).

    "Black leaf spot - caused by Marssonina populi (Lib.)Magn., is the most common leaf disease of quaking aspen in the West. Small brownish spots appear on the infected leaves in late July and early August. The spots later enlarge and turn blackish, and are of various sizes and irregular in outline, with a yellowish to golden border. Infection is usually more severe on smaller trees and in the lower crowns of larger trees. Light infection is common in many western stands, and clonal susceptibility is noticeable. Epidemic conditions are intensified by abundant rainfall in the spring and summer (Harniss and Nelson 1984, Mielke 1957). Twig and branch mortality after two severe infection years has been reported (Harniss and Nelson 1984, Mielke 1957). These epidemic situations may kill trees. However, the effect of leaf spot on overall aspen mortality is assumed to be of little consequence, because successive epidemic years are unusual, and even then mortality appears to be light. In most years, the annual infection repeats only in the lower crown, and usually late in the growing season." - Thomas E. Hinds 

    As Rob says of aspen and lawns, “The best defense is a good offense”. Shallow rooted aspen grow far from creeks and moist meadows in the continental climate of Colorado. In our far west, they are a riparian species. Aspen love deep soils, rich in organic matter & nitrogen, ample moisture and plentiful vegetation or mulch covering the ground far wider than the trees are tall.  Because they frequently have insect pests and foliage diseases (and because they want to spread across the globe), they are best used in the farthest corner of a landscape, along the sunny back property line for their excellent fast growth and dense screening.

    The golden fungal rusts (Melampsora spp.?) that usually affect the Lemmon’s willow in late August nearly every year, began in ernest in late June this year and have also been unusually rampant on Scouler’s willow. Stressed plants from dry winters (very low soil moisture) combined with the “abundant rainfall” is ideal for fungal foliage infections. It is unlikely the plants will suffer. Like their close relative aspen, willows thrive on water, food & mulch.

     

    The golden spores of Melampsora willow rusts. Unusually rampant this summer of "abundant rainfall". Lemmon's willows almost always have this fungus in late August but it started in June this year and it is on most of our native species. it is NOT a worry. FB


  • Hailstorm & Crazy

     

    12:50PM 9 July 2015, I was leaving town to go for an afternoon hike on the west side, taking Old 40 for beauty-sake and I stopped to take a picture of town getting (what I THOUGHT was) rain. I posted to Villager Nursery Facebook how using row-cover can save your garden from hail damage.  Minutes later driving over the summit, Rob sent me this picture.

      

    We were not hit as hard as part of Glenshire / Cambridge was hit in 2013 (TOTAL defoliation) but we suffered 20-30% foliage loss. Pretty rough. The perennials, trees and shrubs will be fine with some torn leaves. Everyone here covered (with row-cover) what they could of the annual color, on VERY short notice and they're perfect.  We've already been giving them seaweed for cell strength and protection as well as organic fertilizers to help them flush-out again this summer. We are working on a Hailstorm Sale Newsletter  this weekend for plants that just won't look as fantastic as they did (this summer) before the 9th.

     

    Marbles falling from ±35,000 ft. Ouch.

     

     

  • 2014 Garden Tour Preview

    Pre Tour CollageRob, Druann and I were allowed to attend the docent / hosts preview tour of the gardens. Our thought being that we could offer insight, ID plants or answer questions the garden club members might have but this is a pretty savvy group and there was not too much we could offer.  There were several plant ID questions that will likely come-up during the tour so I jotted down a few comments here.  You can also visit our Facebook page where it is much easier to post photos and make comments than it is on our web-page.Eric @ Garden Pre Tour

  • Truckee Gardening Season

    Our gardening season and our "growing season" are not the same. We were gardening in February this year, planting shrubs we didn't get to in the fall as well as seeds and bulbs we forgot we had.  MANY clients were preparing their raised-beds and planting beet and radish seeds. The could have been plating seedlings of chard and kale as well. The best spinach I've ever had was grown from seedlings I planted in early April that then laid covered with snow for 2+ weeks. Our growing season, according to NOAA, is our "frost-free period", when we have less than a 10% chance of ≤ 32°F on any given night, is July 15-August 15.  July 31 is the middle of our growing season.

    Our "average" temperatures are derived from wildly fluctuating daily temperatures at all times of the year. The average gives us a rough guide with which we make wildly fluctuating guesses at how cold it might get on any given day.  That said, it is a tool, much like the USDA zones or the useless-to-mountain-folk Sunset western zones (see Northeastern for a more useful tool).  I've posted this pic of our chalkboard before but it "bears repeating".

    Here is a graph of an "average" winter (temperature-wise). Jan15, 2013-Jan 14, 2014. For interest, note where the "average" nighttime low is ≥32° and where the average daytime temps average ≥70°F.

    I think that, without a greenhouse, our "average" mountain gardening season in Truckee is about March 15 - November 1 (or 15).  It is a matter of taking advantage of clear and warm conditions, choosing the right plants and crops and being able to protect the harvests of others (see RowCover). If you have an unheated greenhouse you can add 3-6 weeks on either end of that gardening season for some veggies. 

    I have planted hardy annuals in February MANY times with great success (pansy, viola, dianthus, calendula, stock, primrose) and I have also planted dormant trees and shrubs in December, January, February and March with excellent success.

  • Thank Heaven, a little more winter!

    I'm not going to lie, the nursery has better "numbers" in drought years. It's not just because we ardently promote drought tolerant landscaping nor the fact that we are avid native plant promoters; it's just that our season is longer, the snow melts sooner, and people have more time to spend in their gardens.  That said... NONE of us at Villager want dry winters.  We love wildflowers and lush meadows and obviously fear the threat of fire.  So... we are happy that winter snows have made a nice late showing.  Himmel sei Dank für Schnee!

    I often explain to clients that tossing wildflowers, like hydroseeding, is termed "Spray and Pray" because we spread the seed and pray that weather conditions will be favorable for both germination of the seed and for seedling survival.  Folks that planted seed this Feb and March (my favorite time for s&p), should be delighted come May as the warmed soil combined with all this moisture are making for excellent wildflower success.

    And for real success... We received 8000lbs of Biosol this week, at the request of dozens of clients (before winter returned).  We have about 7400lbs remaining in case your garden melts-out.  We started-off loving all-organic Biosol for its apparent vole-repelling properties but have continued to use it vigorously because it makes vegetable gardens, trees, shrubs, perennials, bubs and, of course, lawns, lush, healthy and strong throughout the growing season.

  • Fall is in the Air, Nursery-Wide Sale 9/13-9/22 2013 !

    Fall is in the Air

    Nursery-Wide Sale 

    9/13-9/22 2013 !

    DETAILS: sale flier here and newsletter here

    "Seconds" - We're bringing out healthy plants with a crook or a sealing scar or a broken top that are not quite retail salable but will grow with compost and fertilizer. These orphaned plants are CHEAP!

    50% Off Fruit Trees is a SMOKIN’ deal!  Apples, Pears, Cherries, and worthy of their blooms alone, Hardy Apricot and Peach.

    20% off (and no tax) on prolific Currants, Gooseberries, Hardy Grapes, Raspberries and Blueberries and will produce more fruit per square foot than any other plant.  The JostaBerry and TastiBerry (gooseberry x currant hybrids) are specialty plants we grew specifically for Truckee.

    20% OFF Tough-as-Nails Trees and Shrubs - The whole LOT!

    75% Off Annual Color: Stock, Geranium, Cali, Petunia, Nasturtium, Tender Grasses, etc...

    40% Off Perennial Herbs and Vegetables like Thyme, Asparagus, Sage, Mint, Lovage, etc...

    50% OFF Packaged (not Villager brand) Seeds:  Lake Valley, Renee, etc..

    30% Off Bulk Wildflower Seeds: (not packaged) >4 oz.

    30% Bulk Grass, Pasture, Clover Seeds: (not packaged) >5 lbs.

    Bearded Iris $2.99 (reg 4.99)

    Hyacinth Bulbs for indoor or outdoor 10 for 8.99 (reg. 1.29ea.)

    Early Indoor Only Paperwhite Narcissus 10 for 9.99 (reg. 1.39ea.)

    Inside the store: 10% off fertilizers, repellents, pesticides, herbicides.

    Inside the store: 50% off Hydroponic specific nutrients and Indoor Lighting and Growing Systems.

    The newsletter has a coupon for $$$ of of Biosol.  Sign-up to receive VERY infrequent news and notices. Sign-up if you want the newsletter coupons.

    40% OFF Beautiful Hardy Flowering Herbaceous Perennials like Coneflower, Daylily, Sedum, Lupine, Daisy, etc........

    Buy 4, get 1 FREE  on Potting Soils, Manures & Bark

    30% OFF Redwood Planters & Trellis’

    30% OFF LARGE  Pottery

    30% OFF Outdoor Art

    Parking Lot “Orphan Plants” Clearance

    All sales limited to stock on hand and no double discounts. Discounts off regular retail prices....


  • Garden Tour Notes and Cart-Load SALE

    The Lake of the Sky Garden Tour was across the north shore on Saturday. Thanks to all the incredible volunteers in the garden club who organized the tour, delivered the tickets and hosted the gardens.  And especially THANKS to the homeowners who dressed-up, tidied and added a little extra color here and there before opening their gardens to 1,000 enthusiastic visitors.  Some of us don't have much opportunity to visit lake-front gardens and that is always an added treat.  Highlights and reminders for me were Helenium spp. a VERY under appreciated and under-used wildflower-daisy that blooms mid-late summer in rich autumn shades. It is seldom eaten by deer.  Crocosmia 'Lucifer' dominated many gardens with it's RED.  Annuals can be perfect, mixed into perennial gardens for continuous color. Even a very small waterfall is a nice addition to a garden.  

    The Villager is having a BIG SALE this week.  25% off any plants or seeds you can put on a cart.  One time, one cart, one customer with coupon from the newsletter.  Plus other specials.  We received our LAST portion of the shrub-form #5g Chokecherries last week and they are going quickly. reg 44.99 for 19.99.  

    NOLO BaitWe also just brought in NOLO bait (Nosema locustae) a protozoan that kills ±90 species of grasshoppers (Melanoplus group), locusts, and mormon crickets (a type of grasshopper).  They are BAD this year and we have started seeing lots of damage.  They are attracted to and eat the bait, become infected, slow and die. Then the other grasshoppers eat them, and become infected and so-on. It is a slow acting and debilitating disease that offers long-term management of grasshopper populations AND there is some Nosema carryover to the next year. It is harmless to any other creatures.  (We have Corry's if you want Carbaryl).

  • Lake of the Sky Garden Tour 2012

    Lake of The Sky Garden Club Annual Garden Tour is on the North Shore of Lake Tahoe, from Tahoe City to Brockway.  It is ALWAYS worth my time.  Tickets are $25 per person with all the proceeds going to gardening education, beautification projects and a generous scholarship program.  Tickets usually sell-out a few days before the tour.  Tickets are available at Villager Nursery but call ahead (530.587.0771) to make sure there are still some to be had.

Contact Villager

Villager Nursery, Inc
10678 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, CA 96161-4834
Central Truckee, exit 186 off I-80
(530) 587-0771
www.villagernursery.com
info@villagernursery

Founded 1975, Incorporated 1990

California Nursery License 1975
No. C 3976.001, Co.29CA
Contractors License 1977
No. 413907-C27 LS
ISA Certified Arborist: Eric Larusson
No. WE-7983A

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