Everything listed under: Tahoe Tree

  • Mid-Winter 2018-2019

    As I closed the gate for our mid-winter season I came back inside to change the message on the answering machine, adjust the holiday lights timers, change the hours on our gate and on the search engines and social media:  Bing, Google, Yelp, Facebook and this webpage (my business partner believes this is all magically done by elves). I look forward to trying to make sense of another crazy season as a nursery in the high Sierra and to plan and prepare for the next. It's a stupid business, really. No one in their right mind would do what we do unless they have a ridiculous passion for it... and we do. We also wouldn't have survived this long ("thriving" in the nursery industry is surviving to open the next spring) without the support and straight-up love of our clients and friends who share our ridiculous passions. Thanks Y'all!  

    We are now "mostly closed" until mid-March-ish, weather dependent but we are delighted to hear from anyone with mountain gardening related questions, bid-requests, or product needs.  Call the shop and leave a message or send us an e-mail and we'll get back to you in a few days.  We are in and out of the shop almost daily all winter as the boys (cats) need feeding and attention and there is 5 months worth of bookkeeping and organizing to get done in the next 3 months.  Bright Solstice, Merry Christmas, and Happy New Year. - e


  • A Fall Sale

    Fall Sale... there is so much to do... 
    Other than 10 years ago and last week, FALL really is the best time for planting here and we really have been bringing in truckloads of fresh crops every week. We also understand that fall is crowded with "chores" and that our eventual snows do curb planting enthusiasm. 
    So... Here's to Fall Planting Season and a Fall Sale at THE perfect time.

    At the risk of sounding like a broken record (we do wind-up saying the same things over and over), there is no BAD time to plant here, though digging through snow (or worse, frozen soil) adds to the adventure of preparing a hole. We are ALWAYS planting for NEXT spring when plants will emerge at the right time in your garden in rich amended soil and a much larger root-system than they had in the pot when they were planted in fall. The plants will look the way they're supposed to look in our mountain gardens. When we plant in fall, the wait for spring is not so long. 
    Fall weather is also cooler and easier on us and the tops of plants (reduced moisture loss) while the soil is continuing to warm (encouraging vital and precious root growth) until mid-November. There is no better time to plant. Deciduous woody trees and shrubs produce ~80% of their new roots in fall, AFTER they lose their leaves, and another ~20% in late winter, before leaves emerge. Conifers produce most of their roots in late winter, under the melting snow. The bigger the root system the more vigorous, robust and drought tolerant the plant. A wide planting hole, ample compost, plenty of organic fertilizers and mulch on top of the soil, all promote roots and thus healthy, vigorous plants.

    We are still bringing in fresh plant material weekly with more trucks arriving from our growing-grounds these next two weeks. There have been quite a few people asking. The inventory and selection is AMAZING and now, the PLANTS ARE ON SALE!  Sign up for our newsletter for details (I'm still finishing the newsletter).
  • Sagehen Creek Wildflowers

    I have not had a report since Monday but with the warmer weather, this weekend should be "peak bloom" for the camas lilies down Sagehen creek.  In honor of that occurrence, I made up a little spreadsheet based on Calflora's "what grows here?" website. Click Here.  Calfora has terrific tools but they do frequently lag behind in updated last names and their "what grows here" lists are far from comprehensive... still, we love them.



  • October Winterizing and Fall Planting Blow-Out Specials

    Late October Nursery Sale thru 10/31

    Check-out the latest newsletter, for those on the e-mail list. http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?m=1102261798136&ca=c5638956-cc07-477b-a090-e8ee25d95775

    Details enclosed.  There are some really great deals. Really.  Check it out for coupons but some of the specials are here:

    October Sale Details   (all discounts are off regular individual prices)
    50% Off: Honeyberry, Twinberry, Mock Orange, Sumac and Oaks
    50% Off: Botanical Interests packets of vegetable and flower seeds
    40% Off: 4" and quart wildflowers & perennials.  Hardy vines including hop & clematis.
    30% Off: Woody trees* and shrubs including many spring flowering and fall coloring plants plus all sizes of perennials and groundcovers larger than quart pots. 
    30% Off: Outdoor pottery, birdbaths and redwood planters
    20% Off: *Quaking Aspen (full truck-load arriving this week).
    20% Off: All G&B Lawn (and others) and Dr.Earth fertilizers (apply with BIOSOL).
    10% Off: Hardy bulbs (excludes bulk bags and crates always @ 20% off)
    10% Off: Winterizing Tree Tape (Villager-Brown 1"x150'x8mil. plus others up to 20mil)

    Visit our Facebook page, our website References page and come by the nursery soon to shop the sale for the best choices.  If you found this newsletter on-line or via Facebook, sign-up to receive your very own.
  • NEWS: Lake of the Sky Garden Club 2017

    A message from the Garden Club: The 2017 Lake of the Sky Garden Tour (Incline Village) has been cancelled "due to the unusually harsh winter".  We hope to reschedule it for next year.

    If you or anyone you know is interested in this very active and fun-loving group, Pat Dolle is our Vice President for Membership: padndad@hotmail.com.  We meet the last Monday of the month (except May when we meet the third Monday).  We usually meet at the Corrison Loft, North Lake Tahoe Art Center (upstairs), 380 North Lake Tahoe Boulevard, Tahoe City. Social time is 3:30PM with the meeting from 4-5PM.  The meetings are informative mixtures of lectures, demonstrations, and workshops conducted by members or guest speakers.  In summer some meetings are held at outdoor locations.

    There appears to be no active webpage or simple Facebook page... for a garden club with SO many great pictures to share, that seems a shame.  Want to help?


  • October 2015

    https://www.facebook.com/VillagerNursery  If you're not on our Villager newsletter list.  October specials: http://conta.cc/1PuK0Bw

    October is like April in some ways. It's a genuine gardening month and a chance to get a head-start with excellent sunny days and warm weather but it frequently turns to winter and on Halloween (like Easter) it's usually pretty hard on he kids. November, like March can go either way.  March has the advantage of longer days for getting hardy veggies going early but November has much warmer soil for keeping roots growing and the shorter days equate to less evapotranspiration and less stress on the above-ground portions of plants while root growth progresses in ernest.

    Plant bulbs now.  We hand select our favorites for their beauty, interest, persistence and repeat performance. Almost ALL of the bulbs we offer you are deer and rodent resistant perennials and we have bulbs that bloom in late February through bulbs that bloom in early August.  You can plant hardy spring-blooming bulbs any time between now and ... February but it's a lot more trouble planting them under several feet of snow or in frozen ground (both of which I've done... more than once). If you're considering planting wildflowers, remember to also plant wildflower-type bulbs and be sure to plant some 4"-pots of native wildflowers at the same time to really get a jump on establishment.

    Fall is for planting. Fall is NOT for pruning. I think the common misconception comes from the warmer climes of CA & the southwest where there really is no winter and fall and spring overlap in December and January (imagine pears with fall color and spring blooms at the same time as frequently happens there.) Woody plants store their winter reserves of food in their stems, branches, trunks and roots (plants are alive and respiring all winter). Fall pruning steals-away the energy they have saved.  Pruning cuts made on dormant wood in fall do not seal over and the fresh-cut tissues dry-out and die-back in our long winters.  There is also a much greater chance of infection from fungal disease when cuts are made in fall. Cuts made in late winter / early spring seal-over as top-growth begins (and the stored energy in the stems has been used to maintain vigor).  That said, if you have a funky branch that the snow is going to remove if you don't... absolutely, prune it now.

    We don't LOVE tree wrapping. We do it because it is inexpensive insurance against breakage and toppling in the first winter or two after planting and it can protect at-risk trees or shrubs for many years where snow is stored, thrown or shoved. It is best to prune well the first few years in order to develop plants that will tolerate our potentially very heavy snow-loads.  We'll have a couple more classes this fall / winter. Follow our Facebook page for far more frequent updates and information.

    Take advantage of the newsletter coupon for Biosol.  If you've never tried it, it is expensive, it smells and it's crazy-good for improving soil, feeding beneficial soil biology and for feeding plants over a very long period. We use it alternately (Biosol fall) with Dr.Earth or G&B fertilizers because they'll also inoculate your soils with fresh microorganisms. It's probiotics folks and it's been going on in farming for millennia.  The Sierras are only 3-4 million years old, an infant range, our rocks need a lot of help supporting plant life.  Oh, and please, don't forget to mulch, on top, to hold moisture, protect roots & microbes, and provide a long-term source of carbon for the soil.

    Indian Summer  (The Sweet-Spot for planting EVERYTHING!)
    Oct. Hours: Mon.-Sat.  9:50AM-5:00PM & Sunday10:00AM-4:00PM
    If you need help with products, plans, bids or consulting, please  contact us with your questions or for an appointment.  You can also call and leave a message at 530-587-0771

     

  • Solstice Summer Sale

    We've been trying to carve out a few minutes to make a Spring Promotion Newsletter, so here it is, a few days past Summer Solstice, a sale to last until nearly 4th of July.  Get your garden on if you have not yet... I planted my greens in early April but have not had a chance to start my Tomatoes yet - (It has become an tradition for me to stay home from the parade to plant mine up.)  They're all 20% off until the 3rd along with beans, cukes, peas, squash, peppers, lettuce, etc....  The mature composts from Kellogg as well as the garden enhancing Chicken and Farmyard composts are all buy-three-get-one-free now as well so side-dress away.  We put a couple of awesome #5g shrubs (maple and chokecherry) on special for your screening needs this week, because they are fantastic.  Ad 30% off of our Apples, hardy Cherries, and incredibly productive currants and gooseberries is a smokin' deal - you can use fruiting shrubs as ornamentals without worry, they're tough and attractive as well as productive.  Sales run through July 3.  Our 4th of July hours are roughly 9-10 and 12-2... depending on traffic and the parade when we are closed.  Please swing by and say hello if you're walking the route (or throw us extra candy if you're on a float).

  • Thank Heaven, a little more winter!

    I'm not going to lie, the nursery has better "numbers" in drought years. It's not just because we ardently promote drought tolerant landscaping nor the fact that we are avid native plant promoters; it's just that our season is longer, the snow melts sooner, and people have more time to spend in their gardens.  That said... NONE of us at Villager want dry winters.  We love wildflowers and lush meadows and obviously fear the threat of fire.  So... we are happy that winter snows have made a nice late showing.  Himmel sei Dank für Schnee!

    I often explain to clients that tossing wildflowers, like hydroseeding, is termed "Spray and Pray" because we spread the seed and pray that weather conditions will be favorable for both germination of the seed and for seedling survival.  Folks that planted seed this Feb and March (my favorite time for s&p), should be delighted come May as the warmed soil combined with all this moisture are making for excellent wildflower success.

    And for real success... We received 8000lbs of Biosol this week, at the request of dozens of clients (before winter returned).  We have about 7400lbs remaining in case your garden melts-out.  We started-off loving all-organic Biosol for its apparent vole-repelling properties but have continued to use it vigorously because it makes vegetable gardens, trees, shrubs, perennials, bubs and, of course, lawns, lush, healthy and strong throughout the growing season.

  • 3rd Dry Winter... so far

    We all hope this force-field around the Sierras will vanish soon and let in our moisture.  That little bit of drizzle and snow was beneficial for sure but not nearly enough for landscapes nor for our snow-dependent businesses.  I count on nordic skiing to get me in shape for working all summer and I've been once... in Utah.

    If you have new platings in a sunny location that has no snow you might consider dragging out a hose and giving those new plantings some water. This is a winter-watering blog from January 2012:  http://www.villagernursery.com/winter-watering-january-2012

  • October Sales & Clean-Up: October 5-13, 2013

    October Sales & Nursery Clean-Up: October 5-13, 2013

     

    50% OFF 4” pot size Hardy Herbaceous* Perennials like Shasta Daisy, Peony, Daylily, Coneflower, Catmint, Hardy Grasses, etc... and including Perennial Herbs and Vegetables like Thyme, Asparagus, Sage, Mint, Lovage, etc... Last chance for these youngsters cheap.

    30% OFF all larger qt., #1g, #2g, etc... hardy herbaceous perennials. (Herbaceous plant: is a non-woody plant that has leaves and stems that die down to the soi  level at the end of the growing season. There is no persistent woody stem above ground.)

    30% OFF All Vines (including Hops, Clematis and Virginia Creeper), All Hawthorne,  All Ninebark, All Oaks, All Snowberry, All Spiraea, Roses (except native R. woodsii), AND ALL MAPLES !!! including the hardiest of all: Tartarian and Amur (Flame) Maples.

    50% OFF all Remaining Blueberry and Blue Elderberry

    "Orphans" - we’ve brought out many more plants with a crook or broken top that are not quite retail salable but will grow with compost and fertilizer. Trees, Shrubs and Perennials.  These orphaned plants are a value: Perennials in 4” pots are 50¢ and #1g are $1.00

    20% OFF Tough-as-Nails Trees and Shrubs  including Crabapple, Maple, Serviceberry, Cranberry Viburnum, Thimbleberry, Burning Bush, Dogwood, Willow, Chokecherry, Potentilla, Mock Orange, Mountain Ash and 20% off (and without tax) prolific Currants, Gooseberries, Hardy Grapes and Raspberries. Apples, Pears, Cherries, and worthy of its blooms alone, Hardy Apricot from seed collected near 8,000 ft in Ouray, CO.

    Bulb Specials: Bearded Iris $1.99 (reg 4.99 Plant NOW) / Hyacinth Bulbs for indoor or outdoor 10 for 8.99 (reg. 1.29ea.) / Giant Red Impression Tulips 10 for 6.99 (reg. 79¢ea.)

    Inside the store: 50% off Hydroponic-specific nutrients and Indoor Lighting and Growing Systems and kits.

    The newsletter has a coupon for $$$ of of Biosol.  Sign-up to receive infrequent news and notices.    Sign-up if you want the newsletter coupons.

    Buy 4, get 1 FREE  on Outdoor Composts, Potting Soils, Top Soil, Manures & Bark
    30% OFF Redwood Planters & Trellis, LARGE  Pottery (>$40), 30% OFF Outdoor Art
    Saturday 10/5 Only: Jose’s 30% off any Evergreen Sale: Pine, Spruce, Fir, Cypress, Cedar, Juniper, Broom, Mahonia, Ceanothus, Garrya, Rhododendron, Manzanita, Cotoneaster or any other you can convince us is “evergreen”.
    All sales limited to stock on hand and no double discounts. Discounts off regular retail prices....Sale Ends 10/13/13

  • Truckee - Tahoe Christmas Trees 2012

    2012 Villager Nursery Christmas Offerings

    The Villager boys (all of us) go out for several days each November and harvest fresh, high elevation silvertip Christmas trees from snowy mountain tops (talk about a work-out).  With the incredible fall we enjoyed this year, we had to wait and wait and wait until it got cold enough to harvest (if we harvest before the deep cold, the trees don't hold-up in your home). 

    And, of course, as soon as it was cold enough to harvest we received enough snow to keep us out of much of the high country.  In spite of chains and slippery slopes and post-holing through snow atop brush, we managed to bring down a few good loads of nice Silvertip.  We also harvested some very full white fir from slightly lower.  We may yet get out to harvest a few more.

    We also brought down 150 BEAUTIFUL fresh Noble Fir from a great little grower, high in the Oregon coast range.  Troy (the grower) uses compost teas and organic fertilizers for superior trees. He actually measures for degrees Brix (°Bx: sugar content) of his fir needles and compares his to other growers. His have far more sugar and as a result, hold more water, last much longer and are more aromatic.   We have Noble Fir from 5-14'.  

    Troy harvests a portion of our Noble Fir with more natural form ("Open Grade"). These have the tiers of branches with space for ornaments (like Silvertip) but with twice as many branches, rich green color and the superior Noble Fir fragrance.

    While many tree lots sell through thousands of trees, Villager nursery usually sells 2-300.  We have 50 or so for folks that pre-order in September and October and we cut-to-order Silvertips up to 25ft. tall.  It is not to late to reserve a tree: call or e-mail to let us know what you'd like so we can tag it and keep it in the shade.

    We usually only sell a third of our trees before the 18th of December and the bulk between the 19-22nd:  4 busy days after weeks of taking care of them and shaking off the snow. The trees stay very fresh in our "refrigerated" climate.

    If you're interested in living trees we have hardy Colorado and Engelmann Spruce.  Our care instructions here and Spruce planting instructions here.

    As always we have a large selection of wreaths from 19in. to 6ft.  We have mixed and fresh cedar garland by the 75ft. roll or by the foot.  We have mistletoe, greens by the pound, swags, etc...  Sales of our super-full 23" mixed wreaths support a non-profit horticultural training center, providing training and employment opportunities to men and women with varying developmental disabilities.  We've been offering their wreaths since 1984.

    In the shop we have beautiful ornaments, candles, soaps, and a nice selection of subtle holiday accoutrements.

    We are still here.  The lights are still on. 

    Merry Christmas to anyone who might read this!  Thanks so much for keeping us alive.

    Eric Larusson

    Villager Nursery, Inc

    Truckee, CA

  • Garden Tour Notes and Cart-Load SALE

    The Lake of the Sky Garden Tour was across the north shore on Saturday. Thanks to all the incredible volunteers in the garden club who organized the tour, delivered the tickets and hosted the gardens.  And especially THANKS to the homeowners who dressed-up, tidied and added a little extra color here and there before opening their gardens to 1,000 enthusiastic visitors.  Some of us don't have much opportunity to visit lake-front gardens and that is always an added treat.  Highlights and reminders for me were Helenium spp. a VERY under appreciated and under-used wildflower-daisy that blooms mid-late summer in rich autumn shades. It is seldom eaten by deer.  Crocosmia 'Lucifer' dominated many gardens with it's RED.  Annuals can be perfect, mixed into perennial gardens for continuous color. Even a very small waterfall is a nice addition to a garden.  

    The Villager is having a BIG SALE this week.  25% off any plants or seeds you can put on a cart.  One time, one cart, one customer with coupon from the newsletter.  Plus other specials.  We received our LAST portion of the shrub-form #5g Chokecherries last week and they are going quickly. reg 44.99 for 19.99.  

    NOLO BaitWe also just brought in NOLO bait (Nosema locustae) a protozoan that kills ±90 species of grasshoppers (Melanoplus group), locusts, and mormon crickets (a type of grasshopper).  They are BAD this year and we have started seeing lots of damage.  They are attracted to and eat the bait, become infected, slow and die. Then the other grasshoppers eat them, and become infected and so-on. It is a slow acting and debilitating disease that offers long-term management of grasshopper populations AND there is some Nosema carryover to the next year. It is harmless to any other creatures.  (We have Corry's if you want Carbaryl).

  • Winter Watering January 2012

    People were pointing and actually laughing at us as they pulled off I-80 when we fired-up the irrigation system for the nursery and landscape this Friday (1/5).  Their loss I guess. We have been fielding calls every day, usually prefaced by "...this might be a stupid question but..." at which point I often interrupt and say "Yes, you should water" (...as though I could read minds).  In our Planting Instructions and Winterizing hand-outs, we say: "Maple, Birch and Alder are particularly susceptible to drought injury in late fall and winter. Always send your garden into winter with moist soil. The last watering is often around Thanksgiving. Even dormant trees need water, so... if we have no substantial rain or snow, water at least once a month, even through the winter."  Your plants are sleeping, they're not dead.
    In sunny locations if the snow is gone, trees and shrubs planted within the last 2 years, small plants, young plants and groundcovers would love to be watered.  We have been watering the sunny south-facing slopes in the nursery since we had that little rain last week.  I watered the sunniest parts of my exposed lawn earlier this week.  Think "light rain" when watering. You want to avoid saturating frozen soil and creating a solid ice layer that will suffocate roots and beneficial soil microbes but all those same components of soil need some moisture to survive. Water only during the warmest part of the day (when temps are well over 40°F) and give the water a chance to soak well in before afternoon shade and cooling sets in.
    This is a year when we are glad we promote antitranspirant applications and plenty of mulch.  

    Colorado State University has a handout on the subject and we are pretty much in agreement with what they say: look here.
    The temperatures turned dramatically cold this fall before many plants had a chance to naturally shut-down (many still have leaves on them). These would be more susceptible to winter die-back in a NORMAL winter. I am already seeing damage to some evergreens (Cedar and Giant Sequoia) and broadleaf evergreens (Holly, Oregon Grape and Manzanita). It will be yet another instructive winter seeing what really THRIVES in our always challenging climate... stay tuned.

Contact Villager

Villager Nursery, Inc
10678 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, CA 96161-4834
Central Truckee, exit 186 off I-80
(530) 587-0771
www.villagernursery.com
info@villagernursery

Founded 1975, Incorporated 1990

California Nursery License 1975
No. C 3976.001, Co.29CA
Contractors License 1977
No. 413907-C27 LS
ISA Certified Arborist: Eric Larusson
No. WE-7983A

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