Everything listed under: mountain garden

  • Late Winter 2019

    We have closed the shop for the past 4 mid-winters (Christmas-March). I've used the time to catch-up on bookkeeping, administration, filing, orders, articles, hand-outs and a few projects (and have a little free time). We probably won't continue our winter closures in the future (we're here and watering the house plants anyway) and this winter there was certainly NO rest. This week (3/25-30) we emptied the inside of the shop and we're painting the floor. We intend to put it all back together next week and start re-opening a little by 4/4 (10-5). We'll leave a number of items in the POD for an early spring garage sale. Many indoor lighting and hydroponics supplies for 50% off (or more).  

    We'll work on removing the snow from the soils area to bring in our first loads of Topper, Gromulch and Bumper Crop. We have pallets of pottery, statuary, gifts and fertilizers arriving starting next week. There is a truckload of fresh tropical houseplants arriving in mid-April (delayed due to floor). Our 2019 seeds actually started arriving in February. We have seed starting supplies - starting soils, trays, tray covers, peat-pots, vermiculite, perlite, liquid seaweed, etc...  It IS time to start a few types of seeds if you want the "full experience" and the thrill of growing food or flowers from seed to harvest. It's also the least expensive way to go about it. If you choose to wait, we will have seedlings of appropriate plants available for sale as planting timing dictates.
    Late winter seedingStart these seeds indoors from late February through April. Plant these seedlings outdoor starting in mid-late April: broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, Calendula.  Plant seedlings in early May: celery, leek, lettuce, onion. Start seeds in March for planting mid to late May (with frost protection): pepper, eggplant, tomatillo, and tomato. Hardy annuals and perennial seeds can be started now for planting into the garden in early May.

    While it is fine to plant trees, shrubs and bulbs ANYTIME you choose, and plants are always happier in the ground than in pots, it is important to never dig or work "wet" soil. Disturbing mud, destroys soil structure, the arrangement of the soil particles into aggregates of various sizes and shapes that allow for aeration and drainage (air is as important to roots as water is).  FYI: Soil texture is determined by the ratios of sand, silt, clay, and organic matter that determine a soil's water and nutrient holding capacity as well as it's workability and more.

    IF you have some bulbs (as I do) that you did not get into the ground in fall, plant them as soon as the soil is workable (remember: moist but not muddy). They will not keep much longer.

  • Mid-Winter 2018-2019

    As I closed the gate for our mid-winter season I came back inside to change the message on the answering machine, adjust the holiday lights timers, change the hours on our gate and on the search engines and social media:  Bing, Google, Yelp, Facebook and this webpage (my business partner believes this is all magically done by elves). I look forward to trying to make sense of another crazy season as a nursery in the high Sierra and to plan and prepare for the next. It's a stupid business, really. No one in their right mind would do what we do unless they have a ridiculous passion for it... and we do. We also wouldn't have survived this long ("thriving" in the nursery industry is surviving to open the next spring) without the support and straight-up love of our clients and friends who share our ridiculous passions. Thanks Y'all!  

    We are now "mostly closed" until mid-March-ish, weather dependent but we are delighted to hear from anyone with mountain gardening related questions, bid-requests, or product needs.  Call the shop and leave a message or send us an e-mail and we'll get back to you in a few days.  We are in and out of the shop almost daily all winter as the boys (cats) need feeding and attention and there is 5 months worth of bookkeeping and organizing to get done in the next 3 months.  Bright Solstice, Merry Christmas, and Happy New Year. - e


  • FALL PLANT SALE

    FALL PLANT SALE 9/15 - 10/15/2017
    Right NOW is the sweet-spot for mountain gardeners: Villager Nursery has a huge, fresh selection, the plants are on sale AND it's the best time for planting everything AND its the most comfortable time for planting.  Visit our Facebook page, our website Referencespage and come by the nursery soon to shop the sale for the best choices.  If you found this newsletter on-line or via Facebook, sign-up to receive your very own.


  • Early Spring Mountain Gardening Classes 2017

    Every spring here is different. 
    We gradually open the nursery as it is appropriate to bring in hardy plants, to uncover and display the ones we have and to encourage planting as the snows melt and the snow storms abate.  We've been open 4 days a week since early April and go to 6 or 7 by early May if warming continues. We will have more snow, of course.  We are bringing a few loads of hardy perennials, color and vegetables each week. With some big loads of trees and shrubs arriving the week of 5/10. We usually offer classes in April and then begin again July through October. These are some early offerings.
    • April 24 - Garden Resurrection and Repair (Spring Cleaning) - 4:00PM @ Lake of the Sky Garden Club, Art Center in Tahoe City. Eric (a long-time certified arborist) was invited to speak after this particularly destructive winter. (visit our webpage). 
    • April 29 - Spring Gardening (w/ focus on basic pruning and damage repair) - 11AM-12PM @ Villager Nursery - Rob & Eric are offering this very basic class.
    • May 4 - Container Vegetables and Productive Tomatoes - 5:00-6:00PM @ Villager Nursery - Villager staff have been instructing mountain gardeners on successful varieties and techniques for over 40 years. (May the Forth be with You!). Hand-Out Here 
    • June 2-3 - Villager / Kellogg / G&B Free Planting Days - Friday & Saturday - You buy the plants and pots and We (Eileen, Gisele, Mike & Duncan) plant them for you using premium Master Nursery Gold Medal potting soil and authentic, organic G&B Fertilizers. Organic gardening specialist and educator with G&B Organics, Gisele Schoniger, will be here Friday and Saturday to answer ANY and ALL compost, mulch, organic landscaping or soil biology questions you can conceive of. 
    • NEWS - the late July 2017 Lake of the Sky Garden Tour has been cancelled "due to the unusually harsh winter". It would have been in Incline Village this summer. For information about joining this very active garden club check the website here.
    Visit & LIKE our Facebook page for random details, frost warnings, or specials on plants & fertilizers and check-out our website for good how-to resources.Ideas on pinterest. Photos on instagram. (check out Joey's @highsierrawildflowers on Instagram) 
  • February & March

    I was just looking back at the rains, snowfalls, low-temps, high-temps for the Feb & March. We didn't see much sun. I grew up in California and in the Sierras.  I'd been to Utah, Coloradoo, the midwest in winters and my memory was of extreme cold, squeaky snow, frozen fingers. I'd been plenty cold skiing and sledding as a kid in the Sierra, but out there, I didn't want to play outside.  Someone who'd moved to Truckee from the east to ski told me years ago that the Sierra winter is 2-3 days of snowfall followed by a week of sunshine, and throughout my life, that been largely true, I just didn't know that it was unique. This winter did not feel that way. I recall shoveling, a lot. The crawl-spaces flooded. Trees bent, broken or up-rooted. I hate to admit that I didn't feel much like getting out and enjoying that white sh*t.  

    We did have some beautiful spring-like days in March, which is normal, followed by more and more winter, which is also normal.  For folks that have moved here after spring 2011, this "spring" might seem unfair but I assure you it is by-far the norm. 

    From a gardening, landscaping and ecological perspective, the soils have been well insulated, are warm and many plants have been able to produce roots all winter long. Hardy seedlings are emerging beneath the melting snow and the ample soil moisture promises an amazing summer of wildflowers. I just walked along one well traveled road with five pounds of native wildflower seed mixed with Biosol.  Like those bulbs and sunflowers on Glenshire Dr. that Katrin and I planted, I hope to see these for years to come. 

    Voles, who do not hibernate, have been eating and breeding all winter, well hidden from their normal predators. We're just starting to see what havoc they have wreaked. 

    I'm enjoying raking my lawn in narrow paths AS the snow melts, just a little, every couple of days and it is a very manageable job.  We're expecting our first load of compost, including topper, in early April and I'll spread that around on the freshly raked turf.  I have SO much pruning and clean-up to do. I'm trying to follow the snow-melt to stay on top of it. If you lost plants, we are very sorry.  We did too and so did most folks. Snowshoing through the woods you can see that this was a harsh winter ALL around, MANY native trees and shrubs suffered damage as well.

    The snow-plow loaders pushed piles and ramps of snow thirty feet into my yard and I've yet to see the tops of many plants while the rotary plows that came through on some very cold nights literally shattered my blue spruce. I've seen the same on native fir. These plants all have root systems to support them, plenty of moisture in the soil and a determination to live and grow. Plants may develop a little "character" that stays with them forever and we'll be able to look at the dog-leg in a tree 20 years from now and say - "Ah! That's from the winter or '16-17".

  • January

    In mid-winter, Villager Nursery is "mostly closed". January and February we catch-up on paperwork, repair, clean, organize a bit, once in a while.  If the sign says we are CLOSED... well, yep.  Apologies.  If the gate is OPEN and the sign says OPEN as it may be, now and again on sunny winter days, PLEASE stop in. We do have a few indoor bulbs left as well as some houseplants we are growing and maintaining.  If you need something, please feel free to call and leave a message or e-mail us.  March is very early spring and we'll start opening again then depending on the weather.  Pray for snow. Get out and enjoy it. Happy New Year!  See you soon.Soliel d'Or

     

  • Water Restrictions and Exemptions in the TDPUD sphere...

     

    Because our irrigation restrictions WERE greater than those in Placerville, Auburn, the Tahoe Basin and MANY other districts...  AND because (as we are frequently told by TDPUD) we have recharging water tables and adequate (if not ample) water supply, WE requested (and were granted: 6/3/15) a hardship exemption, on behalf of the community. SO...  IN-SPITE of our PUD's best efforts to tell you through various media that you can ONLY irrigate on Tuesday and Friday, you can in-fact irrigate as needed when watering responsibly with drip (incl. micro-spray, soakers & drip emitters), syringing (a light spray to cool-off stressed plants), and selectively hand-watering specific plants, planters, and spots in need. "*Plant containers, trees, shrubs, ground covers and vegetable gardens may be watered as needed when using automatic drip irrigation or hand-watering".  The Truckee Demonstration Garden's efforts very early-on gave us the exemption to irrigate all edibles as needed (taken as annual & perennial vegetables, herbs, berry bushes and fruit trees).

    PLEASE.... NO BARE SOIL in your garden. MULCH everywhere. Mulch on bare soil 10 feet from your plants is keeping that fine-silty soil from drying-out and from wicking water away from your plants. DO NOT mulch over tree or shrub trunks or over herbaceous plants (unless with a fine compost like Topper).

    AND..  WATER YOUR SURROUNDING FOREST.  2-4 times this summer, on your watering day, put an oscillating sprinkler out among the big pines and fir surrounding your home, near and as far as you can go.  Water enough to soak the soil 2-3 feet.  We may have "adequate" supply in our wells but we are definitely in a drought and our soils are DRY!. Trees are dying all around us from the past 3 dry winters (desiccation & beetle attack) and you can prevent yours from dying by giving them a couple of deep waterings.

     

  • Truckee-Tahoe Growing Season

    Truckee's "Frost-free Period" according to NOAA is July 15 to August 15. We have many years with far longer periods without frost and some years with far less.  With foresight and effort, Villager Nursery gives clients the tools to be successful in this challenging environment.  Hardy and mountain native trees, shrubs, perennials, wildflowers and bulbs can be planted from before snow-melt to after snow-fall.  

    Our soils are still warming and plant roots LOVE warm soil for growing.  Check our Villager-Nursery Facebook page for the most frequent updates and sign-up for our infrequent newsletters


  • Fall is in the Air, Nursery-Wide Sale 9/13-9/22 2013 !

    Fall is in the Air

    Nursery-Wide Sale 

    9/13-9/22 2013 !

    DETAILS: sale flier here and newsletter here

    "Seconds" - We're bringing out healthy plants with a crook or a sealing scar or a broken top that are not quite retail salable but will grow with compost and fertilizer. These orphaned plants are CHEAP!

    50% Off Fruit Trees is a SMOKIN’ deal!  Apples, Pears, Cherries, and worthy of their blooms alone, Hardy Apricot and Peach.

    20% off (and no tax) on prolific Currants, Gooseberries, Hardy Grapes, Raspberries and Blueberries and will produce more fruit per square foot than any other plant.  The JostaBerry and TastiBerry (gooseberry x currant hybrids) are specialty plants we grew specifically for Truckee.

    20% OFF Tough-as-Nails Trees and Shrubs - The whole LOT!

    75% Off Annual Color: Stock, Geranium, Cali, Petunia, Nasturtium, Tender Grasses, etc...

    40% Off Perennial Herbs and Vegetables like Thyme, Asparagus, Sage, Mint, Lovage, etc...

    50% OFF Packaged (not Villager brand) Seeds:  Lake Valley, Renee, etc..

    30% Off Bulk Wildflower Seeds: (not packaged) >4 oz.

    30% Bulk Grass, Pasture, Clover Seeds: (not packaged) >5 lbs.

    Bearded Iris $2.99 (reg 4.99)

    Hyacinth Bulbs for indoor or outdoor 10 for 8.99 (reg. 1.29ea.)

    Early Indoor Only Paperwhite Narcissus 10 for 9.99 (reg. 1.39ea.)

    Inside the store: 10% off fertilizers, repellents, pesticides, herbicides.

    Inside the store: 50% off Hydroponic specific nutrients and Indoor Lighting and Growing Systems.

    The newsletter has a coupon for $$$ of of Biosol.  Sign-up to receive VERY infrequent news and notices. Sign-up if you want the newsletter coupons.

    40% OFF Beautiful Hardy Flowering Herbaceous Perennials like Coneflower, Daylily, Sedum, Lupine, Daisy, etc........

    Buy 4, get 1 FREE  on Potting Soils, Manures & Bark

    30% OFF Redwood Planters & Trellis’

    30% OFF LARGE  Pottery

    30% OFF Outdoor Art

    Parking Lot “Orphan Plants” Clearance

    All sales limited to stock on hand and no double discounts. Discounts off regular retail prices....


  • Nothing Gold Can Stay

    Nature's first green is gold,
    Her hardest hue to hold.
    Her early leaf's a flower;
    But only so an hour.
    Then leaf subsides to leaf,
    So Eden sank to grief,
    So dawn goes down to day
    Nothing gold can stay.
                              Robert Frost

Contact Villager

Villager Nursery, Inc
10678 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, CA 96161-4834
Central Truckee, exit 186 off I-80
(530) 587-0771
www.villagernursery.com
info@villagernursery

Founded 1975, Incorporated 1990

California Nursery License 1975
No. C 3976.001, Co.29CA
Contractors License 1977
No. 413907-C27 LS
ISA Certified Arborist: Eric Larusson
No. WE-7983A

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