Everything listed under: wildflowers

  • Thank Heaven, a little more winter!

    I'm not going to lie, the nursery has better "numbers" in drought years. It's not just because we ardently promote drought tolerant landscaping nor the fact that we are avid native plant promoters; it's just that our season is longer, the snow melts sooner, and people have more time to spend in their gardens.  That said... NONE of us at Villager want dry winters.  We love wildflowers and lush meadows and obviously fear the threat of fire.  So... we are happy that winter snows have made a nice late showing.  Himmel sei Dank für Schnee!

    I often explain to clients that tossing wildflowers, like hydroseeding, is termed "Spray and Pray" because we spread the seed and pray that weather conditions will be favorable for both germination of the seed and for seedling survival.  Folks that planted seed this Feb and March (my favorite time for s&p), should be delighted come May as the warmed soil combined with all this moisture are making for excellent wildflower success.

    And for real success... We received 8000lbs of Biosol this week, at the request of dozens of clients (before winter returned).  We have about 7400lbs remaining in case your garden melts-out.  We started-off loving all-organic Biosol for its apparent vole-repelling properties but have continued to use it vigorously because it makes vegetable gardens, trees, shrubs, perennials, bubs and, of course, lawns, lush, healthy and strong throughout the growing season.

  • Dig.Drop.Done. Bulbs Demystified

    Fall is for Planting.  While Fall is the BEST time of year for planting trees and shrubs it is also the ONLY time of year to plant spring-flowering-bulbs. 

     

    I have ALWAYS been a fan of bulbs.  They are the simplest and most gratifying form of gardening, literally: Dig. Drop. Done.  Enjoy blooms in spring. "The flowering bulb is the little black dress of the flower world. It's one of the simple things that women can trust to make their lives beautiful. Flower bulbs are actually some of the most reliable and fail-proof blooms available."  Check-out the North American educational campaign, "Dig.Drop.Done".  "Books and websites are filled to the brim with numerous species, lengthy planting guides and tedious details on the ins and outs of gardening with bulbs. It's easy to infer that these plants must be time consuming and require a high level of gardening knowledge."

    Dig.Drop.Done brings to life how easy flowering bulbs really are. At the heart of the Dig.Drop.Done education is a clean, pared-down website that is easily navigable for the avid gardener and the first-time planter. The site is so simple, there is no need to know species names or soil conditions. Appreciating beauty is the only requirement.

    Check these out:  Bulbs 101  /  Meet the Ladies  /   Easy Bulbs Video  /  Dig.Drop.Done. Facebook


  • Nursery Events and Classes in August and on...

    This Saturday's Morning Entertainment: 8/20, 9:30-11am, Come watch Rob and Eric gesture and articulate while sharing the finer details of tree and shrub planting in the mountain environment..

    Upcoming Entertainment, Events and Classes

    August 20 - Saturday  9:30 -11:00 am: High Sierra Planting Techniques - Specific for our climate and soils or “Planting by the Experts”. We'll teach you the methods which our decades of experience and hard earned knowledge have proven to work best in this climate and in these soils. We'll discuss the options and field your questions. These are local, proven techniques you will not learn in any book.

    August 31 - Wednesday Truckee Music in the Park - Fearless Chicken - A Thyme to Plant and  Villager Nursery are this nights sponsor! Come dance with some Villager Peeps for the last Music in the Park of the season.

    September 9 - Friday, 5-9 pm: Customer Appreciation Fiesta -  We will have food, drink and entertainment (they agreed to come again) by Bias and Dunn. José y su familia will be preparing Carne Asada and all the traditional fixin's.  Pot-luck additions are always welcome.  RSVP's appreciated to info@villagernursery.com or call Sarah (our event coordinator) @ 587-0771.  Please come by.  [Last year's pics]

    September 13 - Tuesday, 6:00-9:00 pm: Fall Mountain Gardening & Appreciation of Fall Colors - Are you yearning to have a garden that celebrates the beauty and richness of fall colors? Join us for this informative workshop that will provide you with ways to create a showy fall garden. Learn how to select plants that will thrive in your garden and what to avoid. Many of the gardening activities you perform now will dictate how beautiful your garden will be in the spring. We’ll cover fool-proof bulbs, which trees, shrubs, and perennials have the most colorful leaves, persistent berries or super late blooms. We’ll also discuss winterization. This class is at Sierra College Truckee Campus and requires pre-registration.

    September 24 - Saturday, 10:00-11:30 am: Fall Colors for Your Garden – See the trees, shrubs, and perennials with the most colorful leaves, persistent berries or super-late blooms. We'll cover the chemistry and the natural artistry of a showy fall garden.  Fall can be our longest season of color.

    October 1 - Saturday, 10:00-11:30 am: Fall Gardening - October is a time to plant, transplant and divide trees, shrubs, bulbs and perennials. Collect seed, propagate cuttings, fertilize, mulch, prepare soil and prepare new beds. There is a lot to do to ready the garden for next year's growth.  Deciduous trees and shrubs put on as much as 80% of their annual expansive root growth in the fall, after they lose their leaves.  Fall IS for planting.

    October 8, 2011 -  Saturday, Truckee Fall Color Tour - IF there is interest.  Rob and Eric will lead a leisurely stroll from the Villager to Brickletown and Downtown and back through Old Town, looking for and discussing the beauty of fall. 

    October 15, 2011 - Saturday, Winterizing Your Mountain Garden - A good class NOT to miss if you want the best results for spring.

  • Truckee's Gardening Season


    I saw a beautiful rainbow today.  A neighbor and friend stopped by while I was hedging my Amur Maples and said "drive down to the end of the street and look!"

    It was a nice summer rain.  Made me want to expand on Truckee's Gardening and Growing Seasons.

    At the beginning of the year it is winter.  January gardening entails paperwhite bulbs and amarylis bulbs and some houseplants.  I do check-out the plants on exposed rocky ridges while skiing and marvel at the toughness of Heuchera, Artemisia and Eriogonum.


    February keeps us busy trying to force bulbs for Valentines Day.  On our south facing rock wall, we have had Crocus bloom by late February and be covered with snow and be still blooming when it melts out a couple of weeks later.  After several months of a warm blanket of snow, the earth warms-up and thaws out the frozen soils that we see in late fall.  I'll often pick-up some hardy bedding plants off the hill somewhere and plant up a flower box to show how tough pants are.  Dianthus, Calendula, Viola, Stock, Pansy, and English Primula can all take temperatures in the low teens.

    The first Tuesday in March is THE day to start tomato and pepper seeds indoor so they'll be big enough to put out in mid-May.  Lots of Crocus and rock-garden Narcissus bloom in sunny spots in March.  In low snow years, I have planted many trees, shrubs and perennials in March to take advantage of pre-leaf root growth.  Pulsatilla Anemone usually blooms late in the month.  The first time YOU see bare Earth in spring is a great time to spread wildflower seeds.

    April is frequently a gardening month.  April 1st is THE day to plant sweet pea seeds outdoor.  I usually try to plant spinach, chard, lettuce, carrot, beet (and more) seeds my mid April (This year some just rotted but warm weather usually arrives before mid June).  I also plant starts of spinach, lettuce, chard, onion, hardy herbs and hardy edible flowers like Dianthus, Calendula and Viola.

     May-June-July are the basic spring - early summer gardening months, everything comes into bloom, the days are long and we get frost here and there.  More plants bloom this time of year so they;ll have time to make seeds and store energy later on.  Our "Average Last Date of Frost", according to NOAA is July 15.  Our "Average First Date of Frost" is August 15.  So August 1 is dead-center, the middle of our season.

    August - September - October are a mirror of July-June-May and are the bulk of the late summer - fall gardening season.  The days are shorter but the soil is much warmer than in spring. It is of course the best time to get out and enjoy the mountains and lakes, to collect seed and to plant for next spring.  We are ALWAYS planting for "next year".  Plants only look their best when they've had a winter in the ground and can rise with our natural spring weather.  When we plant in the fall we don't have to wait as long for "next year" as we do when we plant in May.

    November often has beautiful days (who am I kidding? These are the Sierras; we get beautiful sunny days all winter as well). Autumn Crocus and Autumn Monkshood are often still blooming as are a few Asters and the tallest Rudbeckias.  Planting bulbs before the soil begins to form a frozen crust is a good idea.  As the sun drops lower in the sky and the days get really short, shady spots are the first to stay frozen.  Ecology books speak of the "Autumnal Thermal Overturn" when the air temperature stays colder than the soil temperature.  Though it can be hard on some plants, we hope for a good deep frost before the snows come because it is particularly hard on the rodents.  "If ice skating is good the voles won't be as bad next spring".  Deep in the soil the earth is consistantly warm ad once the blanket of insulating snow covers it, the soil begins to thaw.  Wildflower seeding on top of the first 3" of snow is a technique that has worked very well for many.

    Remember that most deciduous trees and shrubs put on the majority of their annual root system expansion in fall, AFTER they lose their leaves.  The secondary root push occurs in early spring, before the leaves emerge and before most folks get out and plant.

    So - were just into the second half of the gardening season with a few months left until winter.



Contact Villager

Villager Nursery, Inc
10678 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, CA 96161-4834
Central Truckee, exit 186 off I-80
(530) 587-0771
www.villagernursery.com
info@villagernursery

Founded 1975, Incorporated 1990

California Nursery License 1975
No. C 3976.001, Co.29CA
Contractors License 1977
No. 413907-C27 LS
ISA Certified Arborist: Eric Larusson
No. WE-7983A

View All Events