Everything listed under: truckee vegetables

  • A Very Brief Overview of Mountain Vegetable Gardening

    In Truckee, our "average last date of frost", the day when the chance of frost drops below 15%, is July 15 and our "average date of first frost" is August 15. It is important to aways have floating row-cover "frost cloth" on hand. It is a spun-bonded polyester fabric developed for frost protection in the late 70's and it is much better for plants than sheets or plastic sheeting. It allows air, water and light through it while trapping warmth. 

    Our brief gardening class handout explains a little more:  High Sierra Organic Gardening

  • NEWS: Lake of the Sky Garden Club 2017

    A message from the Garden Club: The 2017 Lake of the Sky Garden Tour (Incline Village) has been cancelled "due to the unusually harsh winter".  We hope to reschedule it for next year.

    If you or anyone you know is interested in this very active and fun-loving group, Pat Dolle is our Vice President for Membership: padndad@hotmail.com.  We meet the last Monday of the month (except May when we meet the third Monday).  We usually meet at the Corrison Loft, North Lake Tahoe Art Center (upstairs), 380 North Lake Tahoe Boulevard, Tahoe City. Social time is 3:30PM with the meeting from 4-5PM.  The meetings are informative mixtures of lectures, demonstrations, and workshops conducted by members or guest speakers.  In summer some meetings are held at outdoor locations.

    There appears to be no active webpage or simple Facebook page... for a garden club with SO many great pictures to share, that seems a shame.  Want to help?


  • April-May 2016

    Wow, a "Normal" winter-Spring.  Lots of new faces to gardening in Truckee. Welcome. The edibles trend IS a cultural shift and it is excellent. We were the ONLY source for solid gardening information and education for many decades and as more and more folks experiment and learn on their own, they are becoming valuable assets and mentors in the gardening community. Thank You.

    We have always felt extremely fortunate to have jobs we love and to have the opportunity to share with and learn from thousands of individuals each year with as many disparate gardening and landscaping experiences.  We essentially garden vicariously through all these wonderful people.  Slow Food Lake Tahoe and Lake Tahoe Master Gardeners have been putting together some fun classes that we dropped the ball on this spring.

    We hope to make the time to put together our usual Summer-Fall Class series this year... stay tuned.  We are ALWAYS open to new ideas for classes.  

    Don't Forget!... We do have an event the first weekend in June (Fri-Sat, June 3-4).  Our EIGTH annual FREE Kellogg Planting days (See elsewhere on the website for details).  It is always a blast and always busy and Giselle is THE fountain of information for ALL things compost, organic related.  PLEASE ask her your toughest questions.  She teaches classes in Nevada, Humboldt & Mendocino counties as well as across the nation.  Oh, we'll have MINI-seminars on a variety of subjects on the 3rd & 4th... (see elsewhere for details).  Visit our Facebook page or LIKE us for more up-to-date information.


  • January

    In mid-winter, Villager Nursery is "mostly closed". January and February we catch-up on paperwork, repair, clean, organize a bit, once in a while.  If the sign says we are CLOSED... well, yep.  Apologies.  If the gate is OPEN and the sign says OPEN as it may be, now and again on sunny winter days, PLEASE stop in. We do have a few indoor bulbs left as well as some houseplants we are growing and maintaining.  If you need something, please feel free to call and leave a message or e-mail us.  March is very early spring and we'll start opening again then depending on the weather.  Pray for snow. Get out and enjoy it. Happy New Year!  See you soon.Soliel d'Or

     

  • Water Restrictions and Exemptions in the TDPUD sphere...

     

    Because our irrigation restrictions WERE greater than those in Placerville, Auburn, the Tahoe Basin and MANY other districts...  AND because (as we are frequently told by TDPUD) we have recharging water tables and adequate (if not ample) water supply, WE requested (and were granted: 6/3/15) a hardship exemption, on behalf of the community. SO...  IN-SPITE of our PUD's best efforts to tell you through various media that you can ONLY irrigate on Tuesday and Friday, you can in-fact irrigate as needed when watering responsibly with drip (incl. micro-spray, soakers & drip emitters), syringing (a light spray to cool-off stressed plants), and selectively hand-watering specific plants, planters, and spots in need. "*Plant containers, trees, shrubs, ground covers and vegetable gardens may be watered as needed when using automatic drip irrigation or hand-watering".  The Truckee Demonstration Garden's efforts very early-on gave us the exemption to irrigate all edibles as needed (taken as annual & perennial vegetables, herbs, berry bushes and fruit trees).

    PLEASE.... NO BARE SOIL in your garden. MULCH everywhere. Mulch on bare soil 10 feet from your plants is keeping that fine-silty soil from drying-out and from wicking water away from your plants. DO NOT mulch over tree or shrub trunks or over herbaceous plants (unless with a fine compost like Topper).

    AND..  WATER YOUR SURROUNDING FOREST.  2-4 times this summer, on your watering day, put an oscillating sprinkler out among the big pines and fir surrounding your home, near and as far as you can go.  Water enough to soak the soil 2-3 feet.  We may have "adequate" supply in our wells but we are definitely in a drought and our soils are DRY!. Trees are dying all around us from the past 3 dry winters (desiccation & beetle attack) and you can prevent yours from dying by giving them a couple of deep waterings.

     

  • Education & Villager 2015 SPRING Classes

    Villager 2015 Spring Classes - When I first worked with Villager Nursery in 1984 (~8 years after the existing florist was purchased) we began giving classes & sending out informational newsletters. Education in natural sciences gave me a strong bent toward environmentally conscious organic landscaping including natural pest controls and using as many drought tolerant and mountain-native plants as possible. Rob joined us just 2 years later and taught us the wonders of bat guano, worm castings and many organic fertilizers.  The tradition of education and working WITH our ecosystem, continues to this day. We are very disappointed and concerned about the drought AND we have been promoting drought tolerant landscaping and native plants since 1984. Most folks water far more than they need to. Back to the reason for this post, our SPRING class schedule is here if you'd like to see it. For MORE info sign-up for our VERY occasional e-mail newsletters and visit us (better yet, do LIKE us) on Facebook.


  • Colder NIghts - Frost Warning

    5/13: Frost potential the next few nights. Row-cover over tender plants. According to noaa, Truckee's "frost free period" is July 15-August 15 when we have a statistically lower than 15% chance of frost on each night.  Facebook Post

  • Truckee Gardening Season

    Our gardening season and our "growing season" are not the same. We were gardening in February this year, planting shrubs we didn't get to in the fall as well as seeds and bulbs we forgot we had.  MANY clients were preparing their raised-beds and planting beet and radish seeds. The could have been plating seedlings of chard and kale as well. The best spinach I've ever had was grown from seedlings I planted in early April that then laid covered with snow for 2+ weeks. Our growing season, according to NOAA, is our "frost-free period", when we have less than a 10% chance of ≤ 32°F on any given night, is July 15-August 15.  July 31 is the middle of our growing season.

    Our "average" temperatures are derived from wildly fluctuating daily temperatures at all times of the year. The average gives us a rough guide with which we make wildly fluctuating guesses at how cold it might get on any given day.  That said, it is a tool, much like the USDA zones or the useless-to-mountain-folk Sunset western zones (see Northeastern for a more useful tool).  I've posted this pic of our chalkboard before but it "bears repeating".

    Here is a graph of an "average" winter (temperature-wise). Jan15, 2013-Jan 14, 2014. For interest, note where the "average" nighttime low is ≥32° and where the average daytime temps average ≥70°F.

    I think that, without a greenhouse, our "average" mountain gardening season in Truckee is about March 15 - November 1 (or 15).  It is a matter of taking advantage of clear and warm conditions, choosing the right plants and crops and being able to protect the harvests of others (see RowCover). If you have an unheated greenhouse you can add 3-6 weeks on either end of that gardening season for some veggies. 

    I have planted hardy annuals in February MANY times with great success (pansy, viola, dianthus, calendula, stock, primrose) and I have also planted dormant trees and shrubs in December, January, February and March with excellent success.

  • Seedlings are up

    On Tuesday 3/4, Jose and I planted several non-GMO and USDA certified Organic seeds into a variety of mediums in several window-sill starter-kits just to see if there is much difference side-by-side.  We used BlackGold seedling mix, coir expanding pellets (similar to peat-pellets), and rock-wool.  We, of course, watered them in with seaweed. Put them on heat-mats and under T5 fluorescent lights.  Maxicrop or Dr.Earth - no difference  I Just came back to town from a few days away and the seeds are sprouted and well-up (3/10).  Tomato, Pepper, Cilantro, Basil (like CRAZY), as well as native Birch. Check-out the BRIEF veggie planting overview.


  • Villager Test

    (January, 2013).  For the first time, since we took over the existing Villager Florist in 1975, we will try closing for a couple of months.  It seems to make sense. As a fanatical gardener and botanist, I can't help responding to interesting phone calls and e-mails on my own time so if you have a burning question, by-all-means, drop us a line.  I answered a phone message from a Truckee visitor who wanted info about the trees in downtown Truckee that no one could answer so the Town of Truckee recommended he call "the Villager Nursery...they know everything".  We love that kind of high praise ... and of course, it's true.  :)

    We have long used Lewis Hill's book Cold-Climate Gardening wherein it is written "on whatever it is they write it it on up there" that "in northern Vermont the first Tuesday in March, New England's Town Meeting Day, is the traditional time to plant tomato seeds inside".  "They like heat, lots of light and exactly the right amount of moisture."  The Villager will be open part-time by then and we'll be here to provide you with all your cold-climate seed starting supplies from organic, short-season seeds to organic seedling potting soils, trays, heat-mats, lighting and all the rest.

  • 5 Paths to Abundance in your Mountain Garden next Spring and Summer


    1. Plant Trees and Shrubs Now. Deciduous trees and shrubs including apples and berries will produce as much as 80% of their annual root system expansion in fall, AFTER they lose their leaves. Don't miss this opportunity for amazing growth in your garden.(Trees and Shrubs 20% off and Buy-2-get-1-FREE fruit trees and berry bushes)
    2. Plant Perennials Now. Perennial flowers, herbs and vegetables will produce many more roots this fall. They'll rest in your soil over winter and rise with our natural spring schedule to produce far more bounty next summer. (Flowering perennials 30% off, perennial herbs and vegetables 50% off!)
    3. Apply Biosol in Fall. Biosol is a humus rich, natural and organic, slow-releasing fertilizer that improves soil while providing essential nutrients for plants and the billions of micro-allies that help plants thrive. For gardens, orchards, flowers, lawns, meadows and forests. (see coupon in newsletter...or sign-up for the next one)
    4. Topdress Your Gardens.  Applying Gromulch, Bumpercrop or Black Forest Mulch over the soil between plants protects shallow roots, introduces composting microorganisms, ads humus and provides a perfect transition layer under coarser wood or bark mulches. Gardens with more mulch suffered far less in last winter's drought. (ALL mulches, composts and potting soils are buy-4-get-1-FREE through 9/17)
    5. Go into winter with moist soil.  Make sure that after the plants have gone dormant, you continue to water occasionally to keep soil moisture plentiful.  Your plants' expanding root systems need the moisture to keep on going long after the tops appear to be asleep.  We often say water one-last-time around Thanksgiving but you may need to water after that.
  • Start Tomato Seeds Indoor in March

    (03/2010) March is counted as one of our winter months. March also happens to have the most beautiful sunny spring-like days. Rob likes to quote a famous VanDyke who said that "The first spring day and the first day of spring are often months apart".  We may have beautiful spring days for the equinox but frost-free days are a long-way-off.

    For years, just before Valentines day, I planted violas, dianthus, calendula, pansys, vinca, primrose and stock in a flower box outside the nursery.  Those plants always thrive, no matter how cold it gets.

    The first Tuesday in March is Vermont's Town Meeting Day. According to Lewis Hill (Cold Climate Gardening), it is also the traditional day to start Tomato and Pepper seeds inside in northernVermont (their climate is similar to ours in many ways).  We have used mid-March as our seeding time for decades with great success.   I heard recently that said Tomatoes are the "gateway drug" to vegetable gardening.  We all grow tomatoes here (in containers) with great success (and frost protecting cloth).  It's not THAT hard.  Our goal at the Villager is, and has always been, to share our passion for gardening and to see our clients and friends SUCCEED in this avocation we love so much.  

    We offer several vegetable gardening classes at the Nursery each spring; check the calendar page. It should be updated by mid March with this year's schedule.  

Contact Villager

Villager Nursery, Inc
10678 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, CA 96161-4834
Central Truckee, exit 186 off I-80
(530) 587-0771
www.villagernursery.com
info@villagernursery

Founded 1975, Incorporated 1990

California Nursery License 1975
No. C 3976.001, Co.29CA
Contractors License 1977
No. 413907-C27 LS
ISA Certified Arborist: Eric Larusson
No. WE-7983A

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